Piscanäo de Ramos - The "Big Pool"

Piscinão de Ramos is an artificial beach and chlorinated swimming pool along the very polluted Guanabara Bay in Rio de Janeiro’s North Zone.

Despite its popularity, the "piscinão,” "big pool," is controversial. Some north region residents believe it was built to keep them from the luxurious south zone beaches. 

In 2001 the bay, where 70% of the city's sewage is dumped, was declared too polluted to swim in and the state of Rio de Janeiro created the piscinão to bring clean water to the North Zone residents.

The Piscinão de Ramos attracts about 80,000 visitors over one single, sweltering hot weekend. It is loud, colorful and crowded. But one thing is for certain; Cariocas - residents of Rio - love the beach.

  • #FutureofCities - Lianne Milton, The Big Pool

    Lianne Milton

    #FutureofCities - The "Big Pool"

    Sony α7S, FE 35mm f2.8 ZA (F-Stop: 4, Shutter: 1/1000, ISO: 100)

    Bathers enjoy the artificial pool of Piscinão de Ramos, or "big pool" in English, which is surrounded by fifteen favelas next to the city's very polluted Guanabara Bay.

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  • #FutreofCities: Lianne Milton, The Big Pool

    Lianne Milton

    #FutureofCities - The "Big Pool"

    Sony α7S, FE 35mm f2.8 ZA (F-Stop: 4, Shutter: 1/2000, ISO: 100)

    Bathers enjoy the artificial pool of Piscinão de Ramos, or "big pool of Ramos", in the north zone of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on Saturday, November 1, 2014. Thousands of people who live in the surrounding favelas go every summer. The pool, which opened in December 2001, holds 30 million liters of filtered, chlorinated seawater.

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  • #FutureofCities - Lianne Milton, The Big Pool

    Lianne Milton

    #FutureofCities - The "Big Pool"

    Sony α7S, FE 35mm f2.8 ZA (F-Stop: 4, Shutter: 1/2000, ISO: 100)

    Mothers and children enjoy the artificial pool of Piscinão de Ramos. Thousands of people who live in the surrounding favelas go every summer.

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  • #FutureofCities - Lianne Milton, The Big Pool

    Lianne Milton

    #FutureofCities - The "Big Pool"

    Sony α7S, FE 35mm f2.8 ZA (F-Stop: 4, Shutter: 1/1250, ISO: 100)

    Bathers enjoy the artificial pool of Piscinão de Ramos, or "big pool of Ramos", in the north zone of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on Saturday, November 1, 2014. On a hot, sweltering summer weekend, the pool can see upwards to 80,000 visitors.

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  • #FutureofCities - Lianne Milton, The Big Pool

    Lianne Milton

    #FutureofCities - The "Big Pool"

    Sony α7S, FE 35mm f2.8 ZA (F-Stop: 4, Shutter: 1/1000, ISO: 100)

    A young man shows off his Jesus necklace at Piscinão de Ramos, or "big pool of Ramos", in the north zone of Rio de Janeiro.

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  • #FutureofCities - Lianne Milton, The Big Pool

    Lianne Milton

    #FutureofCities - The "Big Pool"

    Sony α7S, FE 35mm f2.8 ZA (F-Stop: 4, Shutter: 1/1000, ISO: 100)

    A woman shows off her butterfly tattoo Piscinão de Ramos, or "big pool of Ramos.”

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  • #FutureofCities - Lianne Milton, The Big Pool

    Lianne Milton

    #FutureofCities - The "Big Pool"

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    A little reacts when her dog is sitting on the chair, at the beach in Piscinao de Ramos.

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  • #FutureofCities - Lianne Milton, The Big Pool

    Lianne Milton

    #FutureofCities - The "Big Pool"

    Sony α7S, FE 35mm f2.8 ZA (F-Stop: 4, Shutter: 1/1250, ISO: 100)

    A boy floats in the Piscinão de Ramos, or "big pool of Ramos.”

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    Lianne Milton

    #FutureofCities - The "Big Pool"

    Sony α7S, FE 35mm f2.8 ZA (F-Stop: 4, Shutter: 1/1000, ISO: 100)

    A view of the TransCarioca Bridge from Piscinao de Ramos. The bridge is part of a larger transportation system under construction which will link Rio's international airport with Barra da Tijuca, the main site of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games.

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  • #FutureofCities - Lianne Milton, The Big Pool

    Lianne Milton

    #FutureofCities - The "Big Pool"

    Sony α7S, FE 35mm f2.8 ZA (F-Stop: 4, Shutter: 1/400, ISO: 100)

    Despite its popularity, the piscinão has a controversial edge. Some residents believe it was built to keep residents of Rio's poorer north region from the touristy and luxurious south zone beaches like Copacabana and Ipanema.

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  • #FutureofCities - Lianne Milton, The Big Pool

    Lianne Milton

    #FutureofCities - The "Big Pool"

    Sony α7S, FE 35mm f2.8 ZA (F-Stop: 4, Shutter: 1/400, ISO: 200)

    Bathers enjoy the artificial pool of Piscinão de Ramos, or "Big Pool" of Ramos, in the north zone of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on Saturday, November 1, 2014. Thousands of people who live in the surrounding favelas go every summer. The pool, which opened in December 2001, holds 30 million liters of water.

    Open fullscreen
  • #FutureofCities - Lianne Milton, The Big Pool

    Lianne Milton

    #FutureofCities - The "Big Pool"

    Sony α7S, FE 35mm f2.8 ZA (F-Stop: 4, Shutter: 1/640, ISO: 200)

    A woman blows a kiss to the camera at Piscinão de Ramos, or "big pool of Ramos", in the north zone of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on Sunday, November 2, 2014. The piscinão holds 30 million liters of filtered and chlorinated seawater, and can attract about 80,000 visitors over one single, sweltering hot weekend.

    Open fullscreen
  • #FutureofCities - Lianne Milton, The Big Pool

    Lianne Milton

    #FutureofCities - The "Big Pool"

    Sony α7S, FE 35mm f2.8 ZA (F-Stop: 4, Shutter: 1/1000, ISO: 250)

    Two teenage girls get their feet wet in the piscinao, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on Sunday, November 2, 2014

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  • #FutureofCities - Lianne Milton, The Big Pool

    Lianne Milton

    #FutureofCities - The "Big Pool"

    Sony α7S, FE 35mm f2.8 ZA (F-Stop: 4, Shutter: 1/500, ISO: 100)

    An ice cream vender makes a sundae for beachgoers at Piscinao de Ramos, in Rio de Janeiro.

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  • #FutureofCities - Lianne Milton, The Big Pool

    Lianne Milton

    #FutureofCities - The "Big Pool"

    Sony α7S, FE 35mm f2.8 ZA (F-Stop: 4, Shutter: 1/400, ISO: 100)

    Havaiana flip flops are left in a pile on the beach while their owners play in the piscinao.

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    Lianne Milton

    #FutureofCities - The "Big Pool"

    Sony α7S, FE 35mm f2.8 ZA (F-Stop: 4, Shutter: 1/500, ISO: 100)

    Boys hang out on a wrecked fishing boat along the polluted Guanabara Bay that parallels Piscinao de Ramos artificial pool, in Rio de Janeiro.

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  • #FutreofCities: Lianne Milton, The Big Pool

    Lianne Milton

    #FutureofCities - The "Big Pool"

    Sony α7S, FE 35mm f2.8 ZA (F-Stop: 4, Shutter: 1/500, ISO: 100)

    Boys jump off a wrecked fishing boat along the polluted Guanabara Bay that parallels Piscinao de Ramos artificial pool, in Rio de Janeiro.

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  • #FutureofCities - Lianne Milton, The Big Pool

    Lianne Milton

    #FutureofCities - The "Big Pool"

    Sony α7S, FE 35mm f2.8 ZA (F-Stop: 4, Shutter: 1/500, ISO: 100)

    A young woman shows off the tattoo on her arm next to the Piscinao de Ramos (or Big Pool of Ramos) in the north zone of Rio de Janeiro. The pool is a local attraction for thousands of local people who visit every summer. I opened in 2001 and holds 30 million litres of water.

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  • #FutureofCities - Lianne Milton, The Big Pool

    Lianne Milton

    #FutureofCities - The "Big Pool"

    Sony α7S, FE 35mm f2.8 ZA (F-Stop: 4, Shutter: 1/500, ISO: 100)

    A teenage girl hangs out with friends along the very polluted Guanabara Bay which parallels Piscinao de Ramos artificial pool.

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  • #FutureofCities - Lianne Milton, The Big Pool

    Lianne Milton

    #FutureofCities - The "Big Pool"

    Sony α7S, FE 35mm f2.8 ZA (F-Stop: 4, Shutter: 1/320, ISO: 100)

    Bathers relax next to a small tree on the verge of Piscinao de Ramos (or Big Pool of Ramos) in the north zone of Rio de Janeiro. The pool is a local attraction for thousands of local people who visit every summer. I opened in 2001 and holds 30 million litres of water.

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  • #FutureofCities - Lianne Milton, The Big Pool

    Lianne Milton

    #FutureofCities - The "Big Pool"

    Sony α7S, FE 35mm f2.8 ZA (F-Stop: 16, Shutter: 1/13, ISO: 100)

    Motorbikes and pedestrians walk on a pathway between the polluted Guanabara Bay and Piscinao de Ramos.

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  • #FutureofCities - Lianne Milton, The Big Pool

    Lianne Milton

    #FutureofCities - The "Big Pool"

    Sony α7S, FE 35mm f2.8 ZA (F-Stop: 4, Shutter: 1/100, ISO: 100)

    A vendor takes a break from selling balls to watch beachgoers play in the piscinao.

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  • #FutureofCities - Lianne Milton, The Big Pool

    Lianne Milton

    #FutureofCities - The "Big Pool"

    Sony α7S, FE 35mm f2.8 ZA (F-Stop: 4, Shutter: 1/160, ISO: 100)

    Bathers enjoy the artificial pool of Piscinão de Ramos, or "big pool of Ramos", well into dusk, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on Sunday, November 2, 2014. The Piscinão de Ramos holds 30 million liters of filtered and chlorinated seawater, and can attract about 80,000 visitors over one single, sweltering hot weekend.

    Open fullscreen
  • #FutureofCities - Lianne Milton, The Big Pool

    Lianne Milton

    #FutureofCities - The "Big Pool"

    Sony α7S, FE 35mm f2.8 ZA (F-Stop: 4, Shutter: 1/160, ISO: 800)

    Young women walk through the community of Ramos, where the Piscinao de Ramos is located. Before its creation, the community of Ramos had beachfront access to the bay, where 70% of the city's sewage is dumped. In 2001 the water was declared too polluted to swim in and the state of Rio de Janeiro created the piscinão to bring access to the beach and clean water closer to the North Zone residents.

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About Lianne Milton

Lianne Milton is an American editorial and documentary photographer based in Brazil. 

Her work focuses on the effects of politics on people and their environments, in places such as Southeast Asia, Latin America, and the United States. Her most important project to date, La Vida No Vale Nada, which examines the effects of post-civil war violence in Guatemala, was awarded the 2013 PDN Photo Annual in documentary and 2012/2013 Latin American Photography Award, among other recognitions. 

Lianne now joins Sony’s Global Imaging Ambassadors exploring her coastal surroundings with her first Sony photo essay on Piscinão de Ramos, an artificial pool along the very polluted Guanabara Bay in Rio de Janeiro.

Interview

Describe the moment you knew photography changed your life
I believe that photography hasn’t changed my life but I would say it has definitely shaped it, and continues to do so today. My drive to make a career and life of photography was influenced by two important women in my life at that time: a friend and a photography instructor. I had been thinking about being a travel writer when I met a Norwegian colleague in a mass communications course at university in San Francisco. She convinced me to take a photojournalism class with her favorite instructor. She said it would “change my life”. So I did and I fell in love with it. Our instructor was so passionate about photography it was practically contagious. For me, photography was not only a way of telling stories in pictures but also capturing a feeling of a moment that I felt while photographing that became a whole new world for me.

If you could sum up your work in one word or one sentence, what would that be?
All I hope for is that my images move people emotionally.

I moved from being a newspaper photographer to an editorial and documentary photographer working on personal projects. I'm not a machine anymore chasing the news circuit. I certainly have enjoyed that work, but I didn't learn anything about my personal vision. Once I was laid off from my newspaper job in 2009, my real growth began, and by doing so, my work has become more personal and evolving.

What is the most remarkable person, place or thing you have ever photographed and why?
Big question. All I have to say is that the world is full of remarkable, resilient people. Some stay with me for a long time, and others pass by. There are places that are more magical to me than others. And there are some that I’m dying to explore.

Talk to us about your bucket list... what is on the top of that list of things to photograph?
I think I’ve kicked this bucket list down the road a long time ago, along with some other things. I really prefer the serendipitous life of being open to what comes my way because you never know what kind of magic lies around the corner. Life can be subjective and happenstance when you let go a bit. You can fill your head with all sorts of ideas of an assignment, or project, or trip, as I still do sometimes, but the best part are the surprises that arise from letting go. I definitely have a story list, an endless list of ideas. Some work and others not so much, which is why I like to see how sometimes the universe can shape things. But if I had a bucket list, it would be mostly to work with certain editors or producers, or even writers, who share mutual respect, connection and understanding about a particular project or story.  

If you had not become a photographer, what might you be today?
The ultimate question. I really don’t know. I might have been an artist of some sort. I’ve always been a waterbug, so maybe something in that arena that will keep me surfing and being creative. Or, perhaps work in the humanitarian field. But it’s really because of photography that I’ve learned much more about my passions and myself.

Give us your thoughts about the Global Imaging Ambassadors program?
I just recently started with the program. I really appreciate how supportive Sony has been with the stories and platform, and I look forward to exploring more with the cameras. I think the greatest benefit for all of us, which include the audience, is that we get to see these amazing, beautiful and very real stories from around the world on the Sony website. And as ambassadors, we can still stay true to how we not only photograph but how we see and interpret the world around us with the Sony cameras.

What is your favourite Sony camera of the moment (explain why)?
At the moment the only camera I’ve photographed with is the α7S and it has been really fun to experiment with. I’m totally amazed at how a compact camera can shoot not just full-frame, and in raw, but it’s also silent as a turtle and the LCD screen is moveable.

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